Sex-Ed: US Colleges Should Take Note of Canadian Efforts to Prevent Campus Rape

I enjoyed this thought-provoking article from New York Times contributor Jan Hoffman on college rape prevention programs.

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/06/12/health/college-rape-prevention-program-proves-a-rare-success.html?hp=

Jan Hoffman is right on with her conclusion that comprehensive rape prevention programs are our best chance to make changes on college campuses. I hope the success this program has brought to three Canadian colleges will inspire colleges in the US to adopt this approach. While more programming for men is needed, we should continue to address this issue from every angle with women, men, and campus faculty. One aspect of my aim as a high school and college speaker is to educate and engage boys and men to take part in changing the culture of their schools. I openly talk about the collision of factors that impact sexual decisions under the influence of alcohol in a normalized hookup culture. Sexual expectations are often skewed by the acceptance (often encouragement) of excess drinking, less face-to-face interactions contributing to less adept social skills, and hyper-sexualized messaging from porn and media. Alcohol, drugs, devices, and porn will always be accessible, therefore it is essential to educate consumers and users through a variety of programming to help change the lens for men. One positive shift I have seen is that more college men are open to conversations on topics like consent and bystander behavior, because they were educated about them in middle school. This kind of programming should be required, but it is also important to continue teaching girls and women about assessing risk, practicing self-defense, and defining personal sexual boundaries. – Cindy Pierce, author of SEXPLOITATION: Helping Kids Develop Healthy Sexuality in a Porn-Driven World

2 thoughts on “Sex-Ed: US Colleges Should Take Note of Canadian Efforts to Prevent Campus Rape

  1. Our society encourages male children to stay silent on the topic of sex, unless it’s with other males ie brothers, dads or friends. Many of our male children do not have a male parent to model respectful behavior, and if their female caregiver does not encourage questions, or is unable to provide a healthy role model, they are left to flounder! Sex ed in VT schools does not cover consent.

  2. I absolutely love this capamign! It’s sexy, its informative and empowering. It addresses all the issues that young people are facing and struggling with. It gives us tools to find a new way and encourages us to respect ourselves and in turn respect others. Also, I really appreciate the fact that it is sex-positive. After all, sex is great! Knowing the importance of asking for consent as well as giving it if it feels right for me, is very liberating. No more confusion or second guessing.

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